What's Going Around?

C.DIFF

Clostridioides difficile(also known asC. diff) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and colitis (an inflammation of the colon).

It’s estimated to causealmost half a million illnessesin the United States each year.

About1 in 5 patientswho getC. diffwill get it again.

Within a month of diagnosis,1 in 11 people over age 65died of a healthcare-associatedC. diffinfection.


/https:/www.cdc.gov/cdiff/what-is.html

2019-2020 Flu Season

Among the many viruses we see causing respiratory illness right now, the influenza virus (commonly called "the flu") can be particularly severe. Infection with the influenza virus causes a sudden onset of fever, chills, dry cough, and muscle aches. Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, sore throat, and nasal congestion.

Some children are at increased risk of more serious illness from influenza, because of conditions such as diabetes, asthma, immunity problems, or being treated with immune-suppressing medications. They are especially vulnerable to complications and should get vaccinated as soon as possible.

Please get a vaccination if you and your child have not yet had it this year!

To learn more about the flu and see the most up to date information, go tohttps://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/current.htm

For more information: See also Flu , See also Influenza - Seasonal , See also Influenza Exposure

Allergies

Seasonal allergies, or hayfever, are very common at this time of year. Typical symptoms include watery, itchy, red eyes; a clear runny nose; sneezing; and an itchy palate or throat. The most common triggers are trees in the spring, grasses in the summer, and weeds in the fall!

Effective non-sedating medications are now available for children over the age of 2 without a prescription for treatment of seasonal allergies. These include loratadine (generic Claritin), Claritin, and Zyrtec. These medications can be given as needed for allergy symptoms. If you think your child has seasonal allergies and he or she is not responding to medication OR if you are not sure, please make an appointment in our office.

Many children do not require allergy testing if they respond to treatment with medication as needed.

For more information: See also Eye - Allergy


Colds and Upper Respiratory Infections

Colds, upper respiratory infections, and URIs are common terms we use to describe viral illnesses that cause nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, sore throat, fever, and cough. The fever usually lasts for 2-3 days, and the cough with congestion and runny nose may last for 5-10 days. The typical preschool-age child may experience 6-10 colds per year. Most colds resolve on their own with rest and fluids, but some may lead to ear infection, sinus infection, asthma attack, or other complications. If you are concerned about the possibility of one of these complications, please have your child seen in our office for an evaluation.

For more information: See also Colds , See also Sinus Pain or Congestion


Cough

We are currently seeing children and adolescents with cough, typically one of the most prominent and bothersome symptoms of viral respiratory infections at this time of year. Coughing is an important and beneficial reflex that our bodies need to clear secretions and to keep open our major airways during the course of a viral cold or upper respiratory infection. However, severe or persistent cough can be associated with asthma, pneumonia, sinus infections, and bronchiolitis, and should be evaluated by your health care provider.

For more information: Previous diagnosis of asthma, see Asthma Attack , If you are coughing because of an Asthma Attack, see Asthma Attack , Any Chest Pain , If you have a Common Cold, see Colds , See also Colds , See also Cough , Barky cough and hoarseness, see Croup , If Earache is your main concern, see Earache


Pink Eye

We are currently seeing children and adolescents with "pink eye." Also known as conjunctivitis, this condition can be caused by either a viral or bacterial infection. Viral pink eye typically appears as red and watery eyes, and is accompanied by common viral cold or upper respiratory symptoms. This type of pink eye should resolve itself as the viral cold improves. Bacterial pink eye usually appears as red eyes with yellow or green discharge. Upon awakening, the eyes often are matted shut with dried discharge. This type of pink eye also may be associated with a viral cold, but the bacterial eye infection itself requires antibiotic eye drops to cure. Good handwashing is very important because both viral and bacterial pink eye infections are very contagious.

For more information: See also Eye - Pus or Discharge


Strep Throat

We are currently seeing quite a bit of strep throat. If your child has a fever, sore throat, headache, or stomachache without any other viral symptoms like congestion or cough, it may be strep throat. Bacteria, called Group A strep, cause this type of sore throat. To diagnose strep throat, your physician will require a swab of your child's throat, and antibiotics will be needed if the strep test is positive.

For more information: See also Sore Throat , See also Strep Throat Exposure


Vomiting and Diarrhea

We are currently seeing viral illnesses that cause vomiting and diarrhea. Usually called viral gastroenteritis, the virus causes inflammation and irritation of the stomach and the intestines, leading to vomiting and diarrhea. This illness, often called the "stomach flu" typically lasts 1-2 days, with diarrhea lasting a few days longer.

It is important to make sure that your child does not get dehydrated with this condition. Offer Gatorade, Pedialyte, or warm soda pop in small amounts every 20 minutes until your child can keep liquids down. If they are unable to keep liquids down, back off for 2 hours, then try the small amounts again. If your child has few wet diapers and does not make tears, or appears limp or lethargic, they may be dehydrated and we will need to see them in our office.

For more information: See also Diarrhea , See also Vomiting Without Diarrhea

Whooping Cough (Pertussis)

We are currently seeing an increase in cases of Pertussis in our community. Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a respiratory illness that begins with mild cold symptoms and progresses to a severe cough. The cough comes in spasms and is sometimes characterized by a high-pitched whooping sound followed by vomiting. Classic pertussis lasts several weeks with some cases lasting 10 weeks or longer. Pertussis is most severe when it occurs in the first 6 months of life, particularly in those who are unimmunized or who are born prematurely. Older siblings and adults with mild symptoms are an important reservoir of infection for young children and infants. Pertussis is diagnosed clinically and confirmed with laboratory tests.

Treatment

While antibiotics have minimal effect on the course of the illness once the classic whooping cough has begun, they are recommended to limit the spread of the illness. Confirmation of the illness by a medical provider helps guard against the overuse of antibiotics in the setting of a viral illness and subsequent development of organisms that are resistant to antibiotics. Control measures: All household contacts of young infants should receive a pertussis vaccine booster. Others who are unimmunized or under-immunized should complete the recommended schedule of immunizations (see our website for the recommended vaccination schedule). Household contacts and other close contacts of those who have been diagnosed with pertussis should receive prophylactic antibiotic treatment to prevent transmission of the disease. Students and school staff with a confirmed diagnosis of pertussis should be excused from school until they have completed a five day course of antibiotic therapy.

For more information: See also Cough


Contact Our Offices

Pediatric Medicine

808-887-6543

64-1032 Mamalahoa Hwy.
Suite 204
Kamuela, HI 96743

Directions

Office Hours

MON-FRI: 8:15 AM to 5:00 PM

808-325-5805

75-170 Hualalai Rd.
Suites D-214
Kailua-Kona, HI 96740

Directions

Office Hours

MON-FRI: 8:15 AM to 5:00 PM

Family Medicine

808 885-1878

64-1032 Mamalahoa Hwy.
Suite 201
Kamuela, HI 96743

Directions

Office Hours

MON-FRI: 8:15 AM to 5 PM
Closed Wednesdays